Who pays if you get scammed?
Contributed - Sep 21, 2021 - Columnists

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Business in the Okanagan continues to succeed despite the global pandemic. There are more and more buildings being constructed and tenants getting ready to move in. The business law team at FH&P Lawyers has been assisting clients for more than 100 years in the Okanagan and are rooted in community. The team provides legal services to people just starting out or that have been around for decades regardless if you are an individual with a small business or a large multi-jurisdictional corporation.

This FH&P Lawyers podcast entitled “Law Talk” will educate listeners on business matters including whether or not to incorporate, estate planning with a business and all other legal issues businesses face.

With people working from home and interacting with their coworkers and clients over email more and more since the pandemic began, the opportunity to be hacked or fall victim to a scam has become more frequent. Businesses specifically, including law firms, have been subject to fraudsters who are looking to get behind cybersecurity walls and cause issues to daily routes and/or steal money. If someone falls victim to a scam, who is responsible for the money lost or for paying an invoice to the wrong person?

Business lawyers Clay Williams and Tanvir Gill discuss fraud in the latest episode of the FH&P Lawyers Law Talk podcast.  They welcome associate Andrea Meyes, who has been doing significant research in this area as these fraud issues are seemingly becoming worse.

Send your questions for any business law topics for Williams and Gill to [email protected].

Parents always will have support
Contributed - Sep 15, 2021 - Columnists

Photo: Contributed

By Rochelle McFarlane

I’m letting go of the shame
Stopping the blame
To create a loving game
One that lifts me
One that shifts me
And sets me free to be
All that is LOVE

What resonates with you?

Can you relate?

Have you ever felt like your parenting practices didn’t fit anymore?

How is your connection currently with your children?

It’s confession time. I used to be an authoritarian parent. Each time I share this I heal another layer of myself and claim pieces of myself back.

I’m embarrassed and want to hide from my “old truths,” but that would serve no one, including myself nor other parents who could be suffering from this pain, too.

So if you’re a parent and find yourself reading this, tune into your heart wisdom and see what comes up for you.

My heart now says: Let the messes happen and the toys be a part of the daily routines, slow them down for teaching moments and most importantly have fun in the process.

My “old self” used to say that I had to rush and go at a speed I could barely keep up to. It’s what I knew, what I thought “good“ parenting looked like.

Parenting is the most important job ever. It’s about raising the next generation of our species. It’s no small job, and more than ever we need more support that fits our family’s needs.

We have the power to change our practices, our beliefs, our thoughts and how we show up while our children grow up.

Now, you might not be like me at all when it comes to my current or past parenting style, but maybe you’re looking for support so that you have the deepest, most loving relationship with your child and that calling in your heart is getting louder every day.

We are innately wired to play right from birth. It’s how we diffuse frustrations to create joy and wonder naturally.

May this have inspired you. Let me know. We are in this together, so let’s rise up and shift humanity.

Rochelle McFarlane is with ESP Parent, a Peachland-based alternative and holistic health service

This column was submitted as part of BWB Wednesdays

Are you on track this year?
Contributed - Sep 09, 2021 - Columnists

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By Hee Young Chung

Believe it or not, the year will be over before you know it. Are you on track to maxing out your RRSP, TFSA and other registered contributions this year? Are you saving and organizing all the documents you need for the 2021 income tax year? Are you wondering when is the best time to re-evaluate your long-term goals?

Now, as we head into fall, it is an ideal time to re-evaluate long-term goals and look at your strategy to make sure it’s still working to help you get where you want to go. A balanced, well-diversified portfolio can help you take advantage of current market conditions and still help you be prepared for more volatility.

Has anything changed over the summer for you? Where are you positioned with work, retirement, children and grandchildren? Are you planning on making any large purchases in the next few months? Are you happy with your year so far? We all want happiness, but everyone defines it differently. We can all agree that competing feelings of anxiety, fear, guilt, or resentment get in the way of feeling happy.

Strategy-wise, are you committed to your long-term goals? Does a diversified portfolio that helps protect against volatility give you peace of mind? Designing and maintain a financial strategy that is focused on your long-term goals will help you to ignore the daily ups and downs, media talking heads and all the noise that can distract you from feeling truly happy.

Staying disciplined regardless of market conditions is a virtue shared by talented investors. One of the main truths of investing is that timing the markets is impossible. However, there are steps we can take to help ensure your financial strategy can handle market volatility:

1. Focus on the long term: Market ups and downs are natural, but a long-term horizon has been proven to be the most effective.

2. Diversification: A diversified strategy should support your long-term goals.

3. Tune out the noise: Obsessing over daily numbers and talking heads is a recipe for stress and panicked decision-making. Remember your goals and stick to your plan.

The pandemic upended many peoples’ routines, schedules and plans, but there’s no time like the present to get back on track. Staying in touch with your long-term goals requires meeting yearly milestones, such as contributions or checking in twice a year with your financial planner. The road to becoming financially ready for retirement can be broken down into yearly milestones. As with any road to happiness, preparation is the key to reaching your retirement destination.

Hee Young Chung is an associate advisor with IPC Securities/Bradford Wealth Partners with a CPA, CA designation specializing in tax planning, insurance, business transition and succession.

When family meets business
Contributed - Sep 07, 2021 - Columnists

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Clay Williams and Tanvir Gill are business lawyers at FH&P Lawyers, serving the B.C. Interior with offices in Kelowna, Penticton and Salmon Arm. They are the hosts of “Law Talk,” a podcast that educates listeners on business matters, including whether or not to incorporate estate planning with a business and all other legal issues businesses face.

In this episode, family law lawyer Kristin Greenough joins to discuss the interaction between your business and a potential new spouse or existing spouse and what would be at risk in the event of a relationship breakdown.

Send your questions for any business law topics for Williams and Gill to [email protected].

Energy medicine making inroads
Contributed - Sep 01, 2021 - Columnists

Photo: Contributed
Daneaya Ziolkoski, left, and Carla Van Voorst

By Daneaya Ziolkoski

With all of the craziness that has been happening in our world in the last year and a half, maintaining a healthy immune system is key for all of us. As I’m sure you know, there is an option to receive an injection, and with that comes the potential for side effects.

I’m not here to debate this with you, but instead I am here to offer a solution for those who may be experiencing unwanted side effects.

As with all pharmaceuticals, there is the possibility of unpleasant side effects such as pain, redness, swelling at the injection site, fatigue, upset belly, headaches, chills, fever and other, more severe reactions. These reactions are your body’s way of dealing with something foreign.

When a body has been under stress for a long period of time or there are other health issues present, these side effects can become much more serious.

Now, I’m sure you’re wondering why I am talking about this here and what that has to do with energy medicine. And those are very good wonderings.

I believe that every type of medicine can work in harmony with each other when given the opportunity.

There is a lot of buzz around the concept of energy medicine.

The teaching of these kinds of medicine may be relatively new, but these are actually very old, ancient ways to heal the body that are simply being remembered. In fact, energy medicine is beginning to show up in many mainstream ways. Click here to learn more.

See, the body has this incredible ability to heal itself. You get a cut, the skin knows how to heal. You catch a cold or the flu, the body knows what systems to activate and in which order to activate them to bring the body back into health. Anyone who has a physical body and mind has the ability to tap into and learn how to support this wisdom, but we are not taught how to do that in most of our society.

Carla Van Voorst has been training in the field of energy medicine for more than 25 years and has learned a thing or two about listening to the body and helping it come back into balance.

Van Voorst has been able to successfully help the body come back into harmony after enduring a huge variety of things, including medication side effects. She does this by listening to the body and facilitating what it needs. There are seven billion bodies on the planet, which means there are seven billion ways this can happen. No two bodies react the same.

This is powerful stuff.

Now, to make it even more effective and efficient, add in the power of the mind with my hypnosis. How this adds to the effectiveness of the energy medicine is by helping the body become more relaxed. This happens as the mind drops into the brain wave of theta and the body automatically begins to heal. That helps the work that Van Voorst is facilitating and, at the same time, the hypnosis is clearing out any mental debris that may have accumulated as a result of the stresses we have been under.

Daneaya Ziolkoski is a certified hypnotherapist based in Kelowna

This column was submitted as part of BWB Wednesdays

Understand death and business
Contributed - Aug 24, 2021 - Columnists

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Clay Williams and Tanvir Gill are business lawyers at FH&P Lawyers, serving the B.C. Interior with offices in Kelowna, Penticton and Salmon Arm. They are the hosts of “Law Talk,” a podcast that educates listeners on business matters, including whether or not to incorporate estate planning with a business and all other legal issues businesses face.

In this episode they welcome the newest associate to join FH&P in Jen Schreurs. She discusses the relationship between your final will and estate plan with the future of your business. Have you created a succession plan? Who will run things when you no longer can? What kind of financial shape will your business be in for your beneficiary?

Send your questions for any business law topics for Williams and Gill to [email protected].

Get your teeth totally clean
Dr. Preety Desai - Aug 23, 2021 - Columnists

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A patient recently asked: “Why do my gums still bleed? I just had a cleaning,” and “Is this normal?”

Bleeding gums indicate an inadequate response to a dental cleaning. It is as simple as that. The purpose of today’s column is to outline the top seven reasons gingival inflammation persists after a dental cleaning.

The most important thing is to figure out why, instead of simply “giving the patient another cleaning.” Research shows that many repeat episodes of scaling and root planing—a deep cleaning—are no more effective than administering a single episode of scaling and root planing performed properly.

Residual tartar and bacteria remain after a dental cleaning. In fact, the majority of the time this can happen. No one can ever remove ALL the tartar. It just depends how much is left and how sensitive you are to the quantity and quality of what’s left. Several reasons explain why removal is never 100%:

1. Pocket depth. The deeper the “pocket,” the harder it is to remove all the bacteria and tartar. In deep pockets, your hygienist removes less than one-third of all tartar.

2. Tooth anatomy. Specific tooth and root shapes present challenges for calculus removal. Crowns and fillings on teeth make things more challenging. Roots have all sorts of curves and concavities to make things challenging. Implants are even worse.

3. Fractured calculus. A recent article discussed the inability of the operator to effectively clean the tooth due to the chemical bond created between the calculus and the tooth root surface. This bond can cause the calculus to fracture during multiple attempts at removal. Repeated instrumentation smoothes the calculus within the surface of the root, making it harder to detect, like burrs left on your socks after hiking.

4. Aggressive bacteria. There are certain microbes that not only rest on the root surface but invade into the surrounding gum tissues as well. Scaling and root planing will not treat the problem. Only laser light energy or antibiotics can clear out these bacteria inside your gums.

5. Operator experience. Research shows that the more experienced the dental professional performing the treatment, the more effective the reduction of bleeding after a cleaning. One study showed that in moderate (four to six millimetres) and deep (more than seven millimetres) periodontal pockets, operators with more experience produced a significantly greater number of calculus-free root surfaces after scaling and root planing versus less experienced operators. The conclusion was that more experienced clinicians can have superior root surface debridement.

6. Patient home hygiene. While you may decide to brush your teeth after every meal, full removal of plaque, done properly, needs to be done once a day.

7. Stress, health and genetics. The gums show bleeding because they are inflamed by the plaque and calculus. Health conditions also affect the immune system and cause patients to experience bleeding gums before and after a dental cleaning. Family genetics can also make you more susceptible to gum disease. Chronic stress hugely weakens the immune system, making it harder for the body to fight off periodontal bacteria, resulting in bleeding.

After a dental cleaning, patients occasionally experience soreness and slight bleeding of the gums when brushing for one to three days, but after that, bleeding should stop. If not, then fractured calculus may be present under the gums. You need to see a periodontist—a gum and implant specialist—for more advanced periodontal treatment.

Periodontal treatment must be staged; this cannot be overemphasized. The analogy is a skin wound. Treatment begins with cleaning the wound as well as possible. This is the “initial cleaning or scaling and root planing visit.” When that doesn’t work, bleeding and/or worsening of the periodontal pockets results. It is important to persist and not give up. It just means another diagnosis must be done and treatment with more sophisticated instrumentation and lasers may be necessary to achieve the desired result to change the local “epigenetics” and remove tissue memory.

All periodontists see patients throughout their careers who have been told that nothing can be done and that teeth need to be removed due to “uncontrollable periodontal disease.” In most cases, this has proven to be false. My colleagues and I have examined these patients and treated them with outstanding success.

If you find that treatment is continually repeated, gums are continuing to bleed, bad breath persists and teeth are starting to loosen, then you need to find a good periodontist—one who can help you achieve control of the periodontal disease and save your teeth. Mother Nature created our mouths very perfectly. We just need to learn how to maintain things skillfully.

Dr. Preety Desai is a laster implant periodontal specialist at Kamloops Periodontist who has called Kamloops home for 24 years. She graduated dentistry from McGill University and completed residency at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, treating medically compromised children. She was in private practice for 3 years in Toronto and in public health, treating new immigrants, the aged and disabled. She also spent many months in Northern Ontario providing dentistry on First Nations reserves. Dr Desai then moved to BC to specialize in Periodontics at UBC. Dr. Desai and her husband loved BC so much that they settled in Kamloops to raise their family and enjoy the best quality of life. She can be reached at 778.471.6001 or by visiting www.kamloopsperiodontist.com. 

How to get your money
Contributed - Aug 10, 2021 - Columnists

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Clay Williams and Tanvir Gill are business lawyers at FH&P Lawyers, serving the B.C. Interior with offices in Kelowna, Penticton and Salmon Arm. They are the hosts of “Law Talk,” a podcast that educates listeners on business matters, including whether or not to incorporate estate planning with a business and all other legal issues businesses face.

The reality when it comes to business is sometimes you don’t get paid. When that happens, what can you do?

There are a couple of different options that our lawyers discuss in this episode of the Law Talk podcast, including small claims court or sending a bailiff.

Also in this episode, find out who the other Tanvir Gill is.

Send your questions about any business law topics for Williams and Gill to [email protected].

Watch out for mask mouth
Dr. Preety Desai - Aug 05, 2021 - Columnists

Photo: The Canadian Press

We all know that daily mask wearing is going to be a part of our lives for the foreseeable future. While they are an effective way to reduce the expulsion of respiratory droplets responsible for the spread of COVID-19, they are not without adverse effects. “Mask mouth” is a collection of oral symptoms that occur as a result of wearing face coverings for extended periods.

Masks disrupt your normal breathing pattern, which is through the nose—both inspiration and expiration. The repercussions are a shallower nasal breathing or the addition of a mouth breathing pattern. This mouth breathing will dry out the saliva in your mouth, and this has serious repercussions. Saliva is a critical, protective mechanism against cavities, gum disease, bad breath and dehydrations.

Mask wearing results in less heat loss through the mouth. I know we are not dogs, but we do lose some heat through the  mouth. It was great during the cold weeks when we could keep our faces warm, but masks will increase in discomfort in  warmer temperatures.

Health-care workers wearing N95s for extensive periods are at risk for lower oxygen exchange but only because we wear  masks all day. These symptoms can lead to headaches and a more acidic mouth, which make the bad bacteria grow faster in the mouth.

Symptoms of mask mouth include bad breath, dry mouth, bleeding gums, cavities, mouth sores and exacerbation of dental abscesses. An increase in body temperature can also occur.

How do you mitigate mask mouth?

• Practise deep breathing before and after wearing your mask for six-second intervals. This will slow the obvious rapid breathing that can occur after putting your mask on.
• Train yourself to slow down your breathing through your nose and take full breaths.
• Take regular breaks from your mask if you are out and about on a number of errands, like taking it off as soon as you leave the store.
• Stay hydrated.
• Wash your mask EVERY day or wear a new disposable mask every time.
• Protect your face and lips from abrasion or dehydration with moisturizers and lip balm.
• Avoid eating snacks while mask wearing. As challenging as that may sound, I have seen it! This will increase your caries  rate because your mouth is more acidic and drier.

If you have developed bad breath from mask mouth and it remains, it’s no longer mask mouth. Don’t ignore it. Mask mouth has been the number one reason dentists are seeing bigger and more problems since this pandemic started.

Remember, we dentists have worn masks right from the beginning of our first year of dental school, so we know what we are talking about.

Dr. Preety Desai is a laster implant periodontal specialist at Kamloops Periodontist who has called Kamloops home for 24 years. She graduated dentistry from McGill University and completed residency at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, treating medically compromised children. She was in private practice for 3 years in Toronto and in public health, treating new immigrants, the aged and disabled. She also spent many months in Northern Ontario providing dentistry on First Nations reserves. Dr Desai then moved to BC to specialize in Periodontics at UBC. Dr. Desai and her husband loved BC so much that they settled in Kamloops to raise their family and enjoy the best quality of life. She can be reached at 778.471.6001 or by visiting www.kamloopsperiodontist.com.

Look for inspiration, not a hero
Myrna Selzler Park - Jul 30, 2021 - Columnists

Photo: Mark McGregor, Unsplash

“Name two people, living or dead, who are your heroes?”

I’m puzzled. I don’t have heroes. I pause and wonder why that is. And if I did have heroes, who would they be?

I google “hero” hoping to get some understanding of my “no hero” syndrome. Typically Canadian, I feel like I may be thinking too highly of myself.

The definition of “hero” clears up this illusion.

Hero: a person who is admired or idealized for courage, outstanding achievements, or noble qualities.

It is the “idealized” word that stops me cold. That definition sheds light on my reticence around the hero word. “Idealized” is someone or something that is regarded or represented as perfect or better than in reality.

Perfect annoys me. My feet are firmly grounded in reality. Anything better than reality, I am not into it. It reminds me of how perfect the images on some TVs are. They are clearer than I see with my glasses on. And the movie seems all the less authentic because of it.

Life will press people down. Anyone who consistently, sincerely lifts people up gains the ability to influence, to lead.

What inspires me most? In no particular order, I invite you to remind yourself of people who have inspired you.

And I invite you to not be too “Canadian” and think about whom you have inspired.

• People who are willing to do hard things, new things.
• People who are prepared to put their fears behind them.
• People who can see the other side of a challenge.
• People who stay positive, optimistic.
• People who keep their heads when those around them are losing theirs, to misquote Rudyard Kipling.
• People who act with kindness when they have not been treated kindly.
• People who love with abandon.
• People who act with grace when they may not be inclined to.
• People who don’t give up and people who “know when to hold them, know when to fold them,” as the lyrics from The Gambler sung by Kenny Rogers reminds us.
• People who encourage.
• People who see the light in others.
• People who freely express themselves with art, with words, with food, with kind touches, with warm greetings.
• People who see beyond the actions, beyond hurtful words, to empathy.

Do you want to be a hero? Or do you want to be inspiring?  Heroes are rare and idealized; they must be brave and accomplished. People who inspire can be found everywhere.

In your mind and in your conversation, change the question from “Who is your hero?” to “Who inspires you?” I think you will find the list will be almost endless.

And finally, in your own way, whom will YOU inspire?

Myrna Selzler Park is a lifelong entrepreneur who works with organizations and individuals to turn their passion into impact. As former owner of Century 21 Assurance in Kelowna, Myrna uses her experience to build value in organizations. She is certified in behaviour and motivation analysis, emotional intelligence, as well as being a growth curve strategist and a certified value builder advisor. As a wannabe athlete, Myrna has run several half-marathons, deadlifted 215 pounds and has now put her mind to becoming proficient in Muay Thai kickboxing. She can be reached at [email protected]

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